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spent $16 billion in three weeks. but america was not going to disappear. it was -- there was panic, no question about it. and we were -- the dominos were toppling and everything, but america wasn't going to go away. >> you had confidence in america. >> sure. >> i remember mika and i went over, i forget where it was, but we went over to host an event, a roundtable, simpson/bowles, and as we were walking in, one person after another, they were all talking about you, and not about how you were brilliant or how you were rich. they all talked about the confidence you had in america, while everybody else is talking about a rise in china, everybody else was talking about how we were collapsing, they said, you should have heard what warren buffett said. the guy is more bullish on america than ever before. why is that? >> how could you be otherwise? we've come through a civil war, two world wars, the great depression, you name it. and this country works. just look where we were in 1776 and where we are now. >> i here the president talking about moving the top tax rate up to 39.6%. and i'm j
a bygone america who doesn't have anything to say to the voters who are going to make up our winning margin, but just to wrap that big thing back around, the 47%, romney did more -- all that have damage had been done by how obama team painted him. and then romney came out -- >> and then romney talked. >> with his own words, revealed in september, seemingly and vividly confirming in his own words through his own mouth caught on videotape, all of the worst stereotypes and kas caricatures. >> jonathan capehart, i mean, 47% we focus on that, we forget this is a guy that gets -- the greatest hits for democratic ad makers. i like firing people. do you remember that one? ten others just like that. he won a big victory in florida and the next morning go on a cable news show and say something equally shocking. >> i'm not concerned about the very poor. >> i'm not concerned about the very poor. >> yeah. for me, the 47% video was so -- i mean, it was shocking in its brutal honesty but also how he was able to deride half the country. literally half the kcountry he said, well, i don't have to worry about
is still viewed as a strength of america. i mean, yes, we can improve it, yes, we can improve our regulatory structure, yes, there's a lot of complicated regulatory issues, but that's still a strength. >> really? financial innovation? what have we brought the world? i mean, i don't know. >> we still have superior capital. we still have superior capital access in the united states and most parts of the world. >> i think the professor's completely right on both fronts. i think the real issues we face are the ones he's talking about, not whether jpmorgan should or shouldn't have found this $2 billion trade, whether or not it's too big. let me finish. lloyd's bank of the uk controls 33% of the deposits in that country. in new york city alone, we have 170 banks chartered, yes, some very big ones. our banking system is not as consolidated as other parts. i'm fine with paying to it. but as a distraction from the key issues of competitiveness, jobs, all the things you just said. >> because if we are seeing real slippage or concern in terms of our competitiveness, aren't these, if you look
by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> we choose to be born or are we fitted into the times we're born into? >>> welcome back to a special holiday edition of "morning joe." >> you're special. >> you should feel very special. >> enjoying your holidays? >> yeah, it great, all that togetherness. thank you for spending part of your morning with us. we're talking lincoln. >> wish the neighbors would leave already. >> are they over there still? >> yeah, they came over. >> do you know their names yet? >> not yet. i never met them. they're from -- hey neighbor. we let them in but -- >> hey, how are you, it's good to see you. then it's like i don't know your name. >> i'm going to buy them all tickets to my favorite movie of the year "lincoln," going to hand it to them on line, get them to unlock it. >> that's a good idea. >> this is a heck of a coincidence. steven spielberg directed film based on doris concerns good win's book "team of rivals," the film turned out to be talk of t capitol hill, and pundits expressing renewed respect for the a
in 1960, i think, was one of the wealth nest city if not the wealthiest city in america and now one of the poorest. >> the fourth largest. >> this is a done deal, going through the house today, to a republican governor and says he will sign it. >> it's symbolic of two things, one, the politics of it all, what we've seen in wisconsin and elsewhere and the unpopularity of unions these days and secondly an economic phenomenon, basically a statement we want jobs and we're willing to take them, even if it means lower wages, fewer benefits, whatever. >> i'm sorry. i actually carried this around because i'm a total dork. have you read "atlantic monthly" article this month on the insourcing boom? you disagree, i can tell. >> he's skeptical. >> he's laughing. he's stoned. >> i'm hungry. >> maybe it suggests that maybe outsourcing was a fad and not a good fad for american business. >> joe, these are stories they love these stories when they happen. the problem is when you get into these situations happening in not very large numbers. here has the really important part. where it's happening is
.88 or select playdoh sets, only ten dollars. all backed by our low price guarantee. america's gift headquarters. walmart. >>> all right. 25 past the hour. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." we'll start with the "usa today." nonvoters have some ideas on how to make voting easier. the top suggestion, according to a new poll, 28% of nonvoters say being able to cast their ballots online would make them more willing to participate in the electoral process. during this year's presidential election, turnout dropped to an estimated 57.5% of eligible u.s. citizens. >> "the new york times," co-inventor of the modern bar code died on sunday at the age of 91. woodland who patented the technology almost 60 years ago developed the idea as a student at drexel university after the head of a local grocery store asked the engineering department for help advancing the checkout process. >> from our "parade of papers," "the los angeles times." sales of chewing tobacco and other smokeless products have risen sharply in california while usage among high school students jumped 3.9% in 2010. nationwide th
to glorify murder while spreading mayhem in young minds across america. and our bill of rights does not guarantee gun manufacturers the absolute right to sell military-styled, high-caliber, semi-automatic combat assault rifles with high-capacity magazines to whoever the hell they want. it is time for congress to put children before deadly dogmas. it's time for politicians to start focusing more on protecting our school yards than putting together their next fund-raiser. it's time for washington to stop trying to win endless wars overseas while we're losing the war at home. we've already given up too much ground across america. we've already seen too many shopping malls, too many movie theaters and too many college campuses. we must give no more ground. abraham lincoln once said of this great and powerful nation, "from whence shall we expect the approach of danger? will some transatlantic giant crush up in a blow? never. all the armies of europe and asia could not by force take a drink from the ohio river or make a track on the blue ridge in the trial of a thousand years. no, if dest
're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreeme
one best selling "new york times" author. he's redefined publishing in america. >> was that taken with his own personal photographer? >> oh, here we go. >> i don't know, did they have cameras when you were coming up? let's be really original. >> i struck a nerve with that one. >> did strike a nerve. >> when matthew brady was taking your shots. >> a lincoln joke, i love it. >> he's changed. >> there's nothing like -- he is, he's kind of like heilemann. >> this is the place to come. >> you're kind of like heilemann. he changes after "game change" goes big. >> no, heilemann -- you are no heilemann. >> are you going to start smoking crack next? >> no, don't worry. >> you've changed on me. >> you have changed. >> since you went number one, you changed. >> no -- >> do we want to go into it, mr. -- >> oh. >> -- spewing uncontrollable verbal -- >> jon -- >> he's a national treasure. >> john heilemann's a national treasure. >> he is a national treasure. >> that says so little of our nation. >> switch topics here. >> yeah, it's such a national treasure that we're keeping him under lock and
pissed off everybody in america. >> congratulations, sir. kudos. kudos to you. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 6th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc political analyst, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr. >> mr. professor. >> good morning. >> professor. >> and we have former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner. >> financier. >> rattner is here. i like -- and we have to go back to that. it's the truth. >> it is! >> money is money. >> in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> we saw him on the streets of d.c. yesterday, and he was very cagey. >> the mean streets of d.c. >> yes. he was so cagey. >> he was. >> yes. yes. >> you can't ever ask those guys what they're doing, wherever they are. where you going? with who? a meeting. >> auditioning for a gang is what i'm doing. >> right. >> yes, exactly. lots of luck with that one. >> should we get to the news? >> fantastic. boy, there's some stories here, unbelievable. >> in the least. >> you talk about libya. i tell you what, you've got assa
in america. >> that's inexcusable. i don't disagree with that. >> it is inexcusable. i just wonder about the double standard. tearing down tents, punching people. really, i don't understand. mike, can you explain this stuff for me? i believe i've said it on the show time and time again, unions, after world war ii, helped create strong, vibrant middle class. >> yeah. >> we talked to steve rattner about jobs coming back to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united
a bygone america, who doesn't have anything to say to the voters who are going to make up our winning margin. but to wrap that thing back around, the 47%, romney did more -- all of that damage had been done by how the obama team painted him. and then romney came out with his own words, revealed in september, seemingly and vividly confirm welcome in his own words, through his own mouth, caught on videotape, all of the worst stereotypes and caricatures that the obama campaign -- >> jonathan capehart, though, the 47%, we focus on that, we forget, this is a guy that gets -- i'm sorry, greatest hits for democratic admakers. "i like firing people," remember that one? there were like ten other ones just like that. >> that's a good one. >> he would win a big victory in florida and the next morning and going on cable news show and say something equally shocking. >> "i'm not concerned about the very poor". >> yeah. >> yeah, for me, the 47% video was so -- i mean, it was shocking in its sort of brutal honesty, but also, how he was able to just deride half the country, literally half the country,
respect to michael bloomberg, he ain't going to convince anybody in america that it's not a slippery slope. he's just not but joe manchin will. other conservatives from the south, out west. people that grew up in a hunting culture, where you walk around the gun room, you sat at night with cases around, with fathers that taught you how to use guns safely, those are the people that will sway this debate. >> here's what i will say about bloomberg that there is -- now, because of how much time he's served, real data in new york city, as to what he has been able to do, that shows certain important numbers going down. he'll talk more about that when he comes on the show. >> understand what i'm -- >> i know. >> understand what i'm saying about mike. mike has been out front on this for a very long time. i'm just talking about willie's concern and the concern of all of us that some law abiding nra members are not going to be moved and swayed by what michael bloomberg says, whereas a guy like joe manchin that grew up in this culture, that understands this culture. >> yeah. >> will be able to say, he
a point when they suggest that america's safety net can sometimes entangle people in a soul-crushing dependency. our poverty programs do rescue many people, don't join the military escape route for poor, rural americans because it's easier to rely on food stamps and disability payments most wrenching of all are the parents who think it's best if a child stays illiterate because then they receive a disability check each month. there's no doubt that some families with seriously disabled children receive a lifeline from ssi but the bottom line is that we shouldn't try to fight poverty with a program that sometimes perpetuates it. >> there are some who actually do attempt to push forward this message in an intelligent way, but you take pete wehner who worked on the romney campaign. i haven't spoken with him, but i've gotten press reports that he helped write romney's speech which i was very excited, a pet wehner convention speech, and he threw it all away. these type of people who have the ability to make what bruce called the compassionate conservative argument, they're thrown
. >> also in washington, washington anchor for "bbc world news america" katty kay. >> no pieces, sorry. >> you'll write one next time. thank you. so we've got a lot to get to this morning. >> a lot to talk about today. >> those exceptions, what are you talking about? >> just in the conversation about everything you thought there were two exceptions. >> rick perry, governor of texas, and -- >> is it bob -- >> they said we need to -- we need to arm teachers. >> we have to think about it. >> somebody in the school with a gun. >> guns in school. that's great. you know what? this gelts me thinking, right? >> really? >> so that's what we're going to take care of last friday. so the shooting in the mall in oregon. >> yeah. >> i'm thinking maybe if we arm like the people that do the smoothies and whatever. >> or the sun glaglass hut thea or movie theater, the kid that give you popcorn. >> spencer's gifts. okay that doesn't make a lot of sense. >> that's an answer. come on. by the way, bock b mcdonald, a i like and respect, bob mcdonald -- i like him and agree with him 90% of the time. on this
, text and data for only $45 a month per phone. would we get the same coverage? same coverage on america's best networks. you saved $146.76 by switching to straight talk. awesome! now you can afford to share your allowance with me. get the season's hottest smartphones like the samsung galaxy s2 and get straight talk with unlimited data for just $45 a month -- from america's gift headquarters. walmart. ♪ in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> 29 past the hour. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." we'll start with "the wall street journal." the national counterterrorism center has been given the green light by the white house to examine government files of u.s. citizens for possible criminal behavior. even if they are not suspected of a crime. the u.s. terror -- >> what? >> yeah. i
of protecting millionaires. >> of the 0.5%. >> everybody in america would have their taxes increased january 1st. this is the absolute worst-case scenario. their position has been so weakened. >> i'm not defending john boehner. what the president has put on the table i think is the position we ought to go forward with, $4090,000 plan with. boehner's plan, he could have done this more effectively, there's no doubt. >> what i'm saying is, though -- >> the republican rank and file -- >> -- if he knew he didn't have the votes, if it fails, you have just made your party the party that's going to raise somebody's taxes that makes $50,000 because they couldn't protect the millionaires. >> but -- no doubt -- but the republicans were already there. if they were not willing to agree with the president to say don't raise it over $250,000, they're already ready to go not only off the cliff but to raise everybody's taxes and at the same time do nothing to avert the reality of having our credit rating downgraded again, which we've already been warned that if we don't take steps to reduce spending, entitlement
in america the past four years, he says this guy doesn't get it. he has no idea how to create a job. guess what? the ceos, they're all on his side. the very ceos who were offended by what the president did over the past four years, almost all of them are now going to the white house, going back to the hill, trying to figure out why republicans are not finishing this deal. and maybe the republicans will finish the deal. maybe -- but it's important for americans to understand where these ceos are. they need a deal to be done, and they don't need these political games being played at this late hour. >> there's no doubt, you're right, that the white house has done a ton of reaching out, something that you and others have suggested they should have done a lot earlier. that has not produced, though, the imperative that we not go over the cliff. there's such a willingness to go over the cliff by people on both sides. i think that's a real problem because you can only get a deal if there's a lot of pressure. this is the easy part, though. getting a deal between boehner and the president is the eas
? when you yourself said, if america wants to be more competitive in the 21st century, we're going to have to lower corporate tax rates, if america's going to be more competitive in the 21st century, we'll have to look at how we make this country more competitive -- >> i think we should lower corporate tax rates, but i think it's worth pointing out that of the 33 countries and the oecd, the group of wealthier nations, only chile and mexico take a smaller percentage of their income in taxes than we do. it's worth pointing out that if you have a lot of money and you earn only capital gains, you pay 15%, which is radically lower than the rates that any other advanced society -- >> should capital gains rates go up so there's not such a discrepancy between what warren buffett and his secretary makes? >> how that works out. >> should personal tax rates go up? >> the simpson-bowles commission recommended that we bring down personal tax rates but eliminate the difference between personal rates and capital gains. and i think it's good to have a little difference. to encourage people to inve
months. america's gift headquarters. walmart. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. inspiration. great power. iconic design. exhilarating performance. [ race announcer ] audi once again has created le mans history! [ male announcer ] and once in a great while... all of the above. take your seat in the incomparable audi a8. take advantage of exceptional values on the audi a8 during the season of audi event. ♪ >>> time for some sports now. peyton manning and the broncos looking for their eighth straight win last night against the raiders. first quarter in oakland, peyton manning drops back and connects with joel dreessen for the score. broncos take an early 7-0 lead. raiders down by nine in the third quarter. carson palmer trying to convert
. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band chicago had a song, "america's calling harry truman, harry, you know what to do." so it does go back -- >> are you two going to sing together? >> going to have a whole show on songs. >> but let's talk about the presidency of the modern era starting with jfk. jfk, of course, assassinated. that's how he leaves office. lbj, a completely distraught, broken man, which i still am haunted by the scene that doris paints as he's there begging this young woman to just come work with him. nixon, of course, leaves broken. after that, ford leafs broken, choked up. the morning after his wife has to speak for him. jimmy carter leaves broken. ronald reagan. every single president. george h.w. bush. >> it's a brutal job. >> they all leave broken. >> well, i mean, look at obama, he's not broken but his hair is graying. they visibly age before -- >> joe's not broken. >> but you know what, he refused to leave. remember? bill clinton still in the hanger four months later. >> they're broken when they leave, but then they rehabilitate themselves. i me
can go back to sleep in america. i wanted to tuck people back in. >> is jack jacobs on the phone? let's take a pause. >> i put colonel jacobs back to sleep. >> no one can put colonel jacobs to sleep. he's hyperactive. as we indicated earlier in the show, a long-time friend, sometimes under ling of general norm an schwartzkopf. colonel jacobs, i was mentioning at the top of the show that the impact that general schwartzkopf, then colonel schwartzkopf had on me from an incident in vietnam that a woman in iowa, peg mullen, wrote about in a book called the "friendly fire" about the death of her son a young army private. general schwartzkopf was the army commander and he was so human and approachable to mrs. mullen. it was impressive. clearly he was an impressive guy. tell us your thoughts and memories of general sworts co h schwartzkopf. >> he was an impressive guy. i he met him when i whe was a mr and i was a lieutenant. i had an unpleasant experience with him during which i was trying to exercise my authority and responsibility. he is a higher ranking guy telling me, no, i he wasn't go
unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basically to take the american standard that bush 41 passed. it was his bill. >> george bush. >> george bush 41's bill spread it to the rest of the world. his son, george w., approved this treaty. it was sent up by president obama in '09, the senate foreign relations committee passed it easily, and then these republicans aband
jefferson, the journey of africans american in this country. it's complex, it's interwoven and makes america what it is today. >> no one's defending jefferson on slavery at all. his hypocrisy is also the country's hypocrisy. and his tragedy was also a big part of the country's tragedy. and it took another 40 years after he died and 600,000 casualties to adjudicate this. >> it's a fascinating conversation. that piece was in "the new york times" on saturday. you can go online and check it out and see both sides of this. >>> still ahead, nbc political director chuck todd and political columnist from "time" joe klein join the conversation. more "morning joe" in a moment. with the spark cash card from capital one, olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles
on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is -- so we don't have to employ the phrase "fiscal cliff" at all during the day? any ideas? anybody got any -- >> how about deadline? >> how about do your job. how about just do your job time. it is ridiculous. a little news, then we'll chatter about this. as if tax hikes and spending cuts weren't enough, there's a new reminder that the nation's debt ceiling is also hanging over the budget talks in washington. in a letter to congress yesterday, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which thr
imposed on the rest of america. it ensures also that we will not face this same kind of crisis again in six months or eight months or 12 months. and it will begin to lift the cloud of debt and the cloud of uncertainty that hangs over our economy. >> it's a real disappointment today. i'm sorry that the so-called super committee was not able to do its work because this makes it much more difficult to achieve the deficit reduction targets that must be done. what happens next is there will be $1.2 trillion reduction in spending through what's called sequester. >> under current law on january 1st, 2013, there's going to be a massive fiscal cliff of large spending cuts and tax increases. i hope that congress will look at that and figure out ways to achieve the same long-run fiscal improvement without having it all happen at one date. >> there's still significant distance between the two sides, but negotiations continue. there's still time left to reach an agreement. and we intend to continue negotiations. >> and so, here we are, new year's eve, and the country counts down to popping champa
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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